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The microbiome associated with equine periodontitis and oral health

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
The microbiome associated with equine periodontitis and oral health
Published in
Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13567-016-0333-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebekah Kennedy, David F Lappin, Padraic M Dixon, Mark J Buijs, Egija Zaura, Wim Crielaard, Lindsay O’Donnell, David Bennett, Bernd W Brandt, Marcello P Riggio, David Francis Lappin, Padraic Martin Dixon, Mark Johannes Buijs, Bernd Willem Brandt, Marcello Pasquale Riggio, Kennedy, Rebekah, Lappin, David Francis, Dixon, Padraic Martin, Buijs, Mark Johannes, Zaura, Egija, Crielaard, Wim, O'Donnell, Lindsay, Bennett, David, Brandt, Bernd Willem, Riggio, Marcello Pasquale, Padraic Dixon

Abstract

Equine periodontal disease is a common and painful condition and its severe form, periodontitis, can lead to tooth loss. Its aetiopathogenesis remains poorly understood despite recent increased awareness of this disorder amongst the veterinary profession. Bacteria have been found to be causative agents of the disease in other species, but current understanding of their role in equine periodontitis is extremely limited. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput sequencing to identify the microbiome associated with equine periodontitis and oral health. Subgingival plaque samples from 24 horses with periodontitis and gingival swabs from 24 orally healthy horses were collected. DNA was extracted from samples, the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplified by PCR and amplicons sequenced using Illumina MiSeq. Data processing was conducted using USEARCH and QIIME. Diversity analyses were performed with PAST v3.02. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) was used to determine differences between the groups. In total, 1308 OTUs were identified and classified into 356 genera or higher taxa. Microbial profiles at health differed significantly from periodontitis, both in their composition (p < 0.0001, F = 12.24; PERMANOVA) and in microbial diversity (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney test). Samples from healthy horses were less diverse (1.78, SD 0.74; Shannon diversity index) and were dominated by the genera Gemella and Actinobacillus, while the periodontitis group samples showed higher diversity (3.16, SD 0.98) and were dominated by the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. It is concluded that the microbiomes associated with equine oral health and periodontitis are distinct, with the latter displaying greater microbial diversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 87 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Researcher 8 9%
Other 7 8%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 26 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 14 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,821,900
of 22,489,683 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#55
of 1,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,651
of 409,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#6
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,489,683 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,189 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.