↓ Skip to main content

Perceptions and practices for preventing malaria in pregnancy in a peri-urban setting in south-western Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Perceptions and practices for preventing malaria in pregnancy in a peri-urban setting in south-western Uganda
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1246-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony K. Mbonye, Said M. Mohamud, James Bagonza

Abstract

Malaria in pregnancy contributes greatly to maternal morbidity and mortality in Uganda. Thus it is urgent to identify possible barriers that limit access to existing interventions. The aim of this study was to assess perceptions and practices regarding malaria prevention during pregnancy in a peri-urban area and explore ways to scale-up malaria prevention interventions, since little is known about malaria in peri-urban settings. A survey was conducted in Kabale municipality south-western Uganda from April-June, 2015. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire targeting pregnant women, who delivered in the study area 1 year prior to the survey. Univariate analyses were performed at assess the level of knowledge and practices on malaria prevention during pregnancy. A total of 800 women was interviewed. The majority of women, 96.1 % knew that malaria was a dangerous disease in pregnancy; 60.3 % knew that it caused anaemia, and 71.3 % associated malaria with general weakness. However, fewer women (44.9 %) knew that malaria in pregnancy caused abortions, while 14.9 % thought it caused stillbirths. Similarly, few women (19 %) attended the recommend four antenatal care visits; less than a half (48.8 %) accessed two doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for malaria prevention in pregnancy while 16.3 % received at least three doses of SP, as recommended by the current policy. The main reasons for poor antenatal care attendance were: women felt healthy and did not see a need to go for antenatal care, long distances and long waiting hours at clinics. The reasons given for not taking SP for malaria prevention were: women were not feeling sick; they were not aware of the benefits of SP in pregnancy, they were sleeping under insecticide-treated nets; fear of side effects of SP; and the antenatal care clinics were far. Despite a good knowledge that malaria is a dangerous disease in pregnancy, there was poor access to antenatal care and use of SP for malaria prevention in pregnancy. There is urgent to address existing health system constraints in order to increases access to malaria prevention in pregnancy in this setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Madagascar 1 1%
Unknown 90 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 32%
Student > Bachelor 18 20%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 3%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 16%
Social Sciences 13 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,678,596
of 7,584,550 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#710
of 2,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,280
of 269,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#51
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,584,550 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,549 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,055 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.