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Malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies sibling species differentiation using egg morphometry and morphology

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
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Title
Malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies sibling species differentiation using egg morphometry and morphology
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1478-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Varun Tyagi, A. K. Sharma, Sunil Dhiman, A. R. Srivastava, Ruchi Yadav, D. Sukumaran, O. P. Agrawal, Vijay Veer

Abstract

The malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (sensu lato) is an important malaria vector in Southeast Asia which comprises of five sibling species namely A, B, C, D and E. However, only a few forms have been identified as malaria vectors in various endemic countries. Currently, for the first time egg morphometry and morphology has been used to differentiate the three known vector sibling species of Anopheles culicifacies collected from malaria endemic Madhya Pradesh state of central India. The adult An. culicifacies (s.l.) was collected from five districts using standard mosquito collection methods. Adult female mosquitoes were allowed to lay eggs individually. The emerged mosquitoes were identified using allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) to sibling species. Eggs of sibling species A, D and E were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphometric and morphological characteristics. Currently AS-PCR identified four known sibling species (B, C, D and E) of An. culicifacies in the study area. The surface morphology and morphometric attributes of the sibling species A, D and E eggs considerably differed from each other. An. culicifacies E had a narrow deck as compared to A and D, while An. culicifacies A had a bigger micropyle with 6-7 sectors as compared to D and E that had 6 sectors. An. culicifacies D had the smallest float (the structure present on sides of the egg surface in which air is filled that help in floating) and the number of ribs was also fewer than for An. culicifacies A and E. The present study provides the first evidence that in addition to PCR assay, sibling species of An. culicifacies can also be differentiated using morphological and morphometric characteristics of the egg stage. The results also advocate that the sibling species of An. culicifacies are morphologically dissimilar and can be resolved using advanced microscopy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 9 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,730,544
of 7,571,218 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,489
of 2,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,667
of 268,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#156
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,571,218 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,067 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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