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Ammonium ions improve the survival of glutamine-starved hybridoma cells

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, April 2016
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Title
Ammonium ions improve the survival of glutamine-starved hybridoma cells
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13578-016-0092-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdelmuhsen Abusneina, Abdelmuhsen Abusneina, Eric R. Gauthier

Abstract

As a consequence of a reprogrammed metabolism, cancer cells are dependent on the amino acid l-glutamine for their survival, a phenomenon that currently forms the basis for the generation of new, cancer-specific therapies. In this paper, we report on the role which ammonium ions, a product of glutaminolysis, play on the survival of l-glutamine-deprived Sp2/0-Ag14 mouse hybridoma cells. The supplementation of l-glutamine-starved Sp2/0-Ag14 cell cultures with either ammonium acetate or ammonium chloride resulted in a significant increase in viability. This effect did not depend on the ability of cells to synthesize l-glutamine, and was not affected by the co-supplementation with α-ketoglutarate. When we examined the effect of ammonium acetate and ammonium chloride on the induction of apoptosis by glutamine deprivation, we found that ammonium salts did not prevent caspase-3 activation or cytochrome c leakage, indicating that they did not act by modulating core apoptotic processes. However, both ammonium acetate and ammonium chloride caused a significant reduction in the number of l-glutamine-starved cells exhibiting apoptotic nuclear fragmentation and/or condensation. All together, our results show that ammonium ions promote the survival of l-glutamine-deprived Sp2/0-Ag14 cells and modulate late-apoptotic events. These findings highlight the complexity of the modulation of cell survival by l-glutamine, and suggest that targeting survival-signaling pathways modulated by ammonium ions should be examined as a potential anti-cancer strategy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 27%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,718,268
of 7,554,544 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#113
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,532
of 268,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#9
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,554,544 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.