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Overloading the immunity of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae with multiple immune challenges

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Overloading the immunity of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae with multiple immune challenges
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1491-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. M. G. Barreaux, P. Barreaux, J. C. Koella

Abstract

Melanisation - the production and deposition of a layer of melanin that encapsulates many pathogens, including bacteria, filarial nematodes and malaria parasites is one of the main immune responses in mosquitoes. Can a high parasite load overload this immune response? If so, how is the melanisation response distributed among the individual parasites? We considered these questions with the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by inoculating individuals simultaneously with one, two or three negatively charged Sephadex beads, and estimating the melanisation as the darkness of the bead (which ranges from about 0 for unmelanised beads to 100 for the most melanised beads of our experiment). As the number of beads increased, the average degree to which beads were melanised decreased from 71 to 50. While the darkness of the least melanised bead in a mosquito decreased from an average of 71 to 35, the darkness of the most strongly melanised one did not change with the number of beads. As the number of beads increased, the mosquito's immune response became overloaded. The mosquito's response was to prioritise the melanisation of one bead rather than distributing its response over all beads. Such immune overloading may be an important factor underlying the evolution of resistance against vector-borne diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 39 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 33%
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Master 5 12%
Professor 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 24%
Psychology 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,653,100
of 14,537,784 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#773
of 3,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,536
of 214,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,784 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,924 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 214,851 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them