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Nutritional parameters affecting severity of pneumonia and length of hospital stay in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia: a retrospective cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, November 2015
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Title
Nutritional parameters affecting severity of pneumonia and length of hospital stay in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia: a retrospective cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0143-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nobuhiro Akuzawa, Hiroshi Naito

Abstract

Pneumococcal pneumonia is the most common form of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Although a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has contributed to a reduction in the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia among older children and adults, no significant decrease in the incidence has been observed among persons aged ≥65 years. A low body mass index and hypoalbuminemia are common in Japanese patients with CAP, but the association of other nutritional parameters with the severity of pneumonia or length of hospital stay in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia is unclear. Fifty-seven previously healthy inpatients who presented with pneumococcal pneumonia were divided into two groups: those aged ≥65 years (n = 36) and those aged <65 years (n = 21). Patients' characteristics (the Confusion, Urea, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65) score), the pneumonia severity index (PSI), and inflammatory and metabolic nutritional parameters were compared between the two groups. The older group showed significantly lower serum albumin and cholinesterase (ChE) levels. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the PSI was positively correlated with age in both groups. In the younger age group, both the CURB-65 score and PSI showed significant negative correlations with the serum ChE level, and there was a significant negative correlation between the length of stay and serum total cholesterol (T-cho) level. In the older group, the fasting period, lymphocyte count, and age showed significant positive correlations with the length of stay. There was a significant negative correlation between the length of stay and serum albumin level, but no correlation with the serum ChE or T-cho levels, in the older patients. Our findings suggest that in patients aged <65 years, age and serum ChE and T-cho levels were associated with both the severity of pneumococcal pneumonia and length of stay. In contrast, the length of stay in older patients was associated with multiple factors that differed from those in younger patients. These differences may reflect age-related immunosenescence in older patients and a greater effect of serum ChE and T-cho levels on immunity in younger patients.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Master 7 15%
Other 4 9%
Researcher 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,544,929
of 7,556,298 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#510
of 598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,364
of 244,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#36
of 46 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 598 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.