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Real-time tablet-based resuscitation documentation by the team leader: evaluating documentation quality and clinical performance

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Real-time tablet-based resuscitation documentation by the team leader: evaluating documentation quality and clinical performance
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0242-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Grundgeiger, M. Albert, D. Reinhardt, O. Happel, A. Steinisch, T. Wurmb

Abstract

Precise and complete documentation of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitations is important but data quality can be poor. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a tablet-based application for real-time resuscitation documentation used by the emergency team leader on documentation quality and clinical performance of the emergency team. Senior anaesthesiologists either used the tablet-based application during the simulated resuscitation for documentation and also used the application for the final documentation or conducted the full documentation at the end of the scenario using the local hospital information system. The latter procedure represents the current local documentation method. All scenarios were video recorded. To assess the documentation, we compared the precision of intervention delivery times, documentation completeness, and final documentation time. To assess clinical performance, we compared adherence to guidelines for defibrillation and adrenaline administration, the no-flow fraction, and the time to first defibrillation. The results showed significant benefits for the tablet-based application compared to the hospital information system for precision of the intervention delivery times, the final documentation time, and the no-flow fraction. We observed no differences between the groups for documentation completeness, adherence to guidelines for defibrillation and adrenaline administration, and the time to first defibrillation. In the presented study, we observed that a tablet-based application can improve documentation data quality. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a well-designed application can be used in real-time by a member of the emergency team with possible beneficial effects on clinical performance. The present evaluation confirms the advantage of tablet-based documentation tools and also shows that the application can be used by an active member of an emergency team without compromising clinical performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 22%
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Other 5 8%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 51%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Computer Science 3 5%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,431,690
of 7,719,347 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#338
of 578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,170
of 268,939 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#38
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,719,347 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,939 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.