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Predictors of weight loss in young adults who are over-weight or obese and have psychosocial problems: a post hoc analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, April 2016
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Title
Predictors of weight loss in young adults who are over-weight or obese and have psychosocial problems: a post hoc analysis
Published in
BMC Family Practice, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12875-016-0437-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jørgen Lous, Kirsten S. Freund

Abstract

The aim of this study is in a general practice trial setting to identify predictive factors for weight loss after 1 year among young adults who are over-weight or obese and who have several psychosocial problems. Twenty-eight general practitioners recruited 495 patients aged 20-45 years with psychosocial problems for a randomized general preventive study to increase self-efficacy to achieve a self-prioritised goal for a better life by discussions of resources and barriers for reaching the goal. The present study is a post hoc analysis of possible predictors of weight loss among all 218 patients who have over-weight or obesity. A 23-pages questionnaire was completed before and 1 year after randomization. 111 patients had a one-hour preventive health consultation with their general practitioners focused on life coaching and a follow-up consultation within 3 months, and 107 patients had no preventive consultation. Twenty-two patients stated during the preventive consultation that weight loss was a prioritised goal. They had a mean weight loss of 4.7 kgs compared with 1.6 kgs in the group without this goal and 1.6 kgs in the group without preventive consultation. In a logistic regression model, predictors of weight loss or no weight loss were a) pre-interventional consideration of weight loss within 30 days, b) having weight loss as a prioritised goal for improved quality of life, c) being female, d) being in the oldest half of participants, and e) having many psychosocial problems. In a linear regression model, the predictors together explained about 11 % of the weight loss. Important predictors were: obesity (explained 4 %), pre-interventional consideration of weight loss within 30 days (3 %), and having a preventive health consultation with weight loss as a prioritised goal (2 %). Pre-interventional consideration of weight loss within 30 days and having weight loss as a prioritised goal during the health consultation were two important predictors for weight loss. By structured interventions focussing on the patients' priorities, self-chosen goals, their resources and barriers for reaching the goals, changes may be obtained; especially in participants with many problems who often do not accept participation in procedures on risks. NCT 01231256 , Aug. 22. 2010.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Researcher 8 9%
Librarian 5 5%
Other 21 22%
Unknown 18 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 16%
Psychology 9 10%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Computer Science 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 20 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#10,566,839
of 16,507,304 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,194
of 1,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,913
of 267,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,507,304 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,674 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,032 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them