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Mental health among men who have sex with men in Cambodia: Implications for integration of mental health services within HIV programmes

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
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Title
Mental health among men who have sex with men in Cambodia: Implications for integration of mental health services within HIV programmes
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12939-016-0342-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siyan Yi, Sovannary Tuot, Pheak Chhoun, Khuondyla Pal, Sok Chamreun Choub, Gitau Mburu

Abstract

Poor mental health contributes to poor HIV prevention, treatment and care outcomes. This paper documents factors associated with psychological distress among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Cambodia and discusses potential ways in which routine mental health management could be integrated into HIV services. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 394 MSM randomly selected from two provinces using a two-stage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire was used to assess psychological distress, sexual behaviors, substance use, adverse childhood experiences and family dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to explore factors associated with levels of psychological distress. In total, 10.7 % of the respondents reported having suicidal thoughts and 6.6 % reported having attempted to commit suicide in the past three months, while 38.8 % had a higher level of psychological distress (GHQ-12 > 3), which indicates poor mental health. Higher levels of psychological distress were independently associated with older age (AOR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03-1.14), alcohol use (AOR = 3.3, 95 % CI 1.36-7.83), illicit drug use (AOR = 3.53, 95 % CI 1.12-11.18), poor self-reported quality of life (AOR = 7.45, 95 % CI 1.79-3.04), and reduced condom use at last sex (AOR = 0.40, 95 % CI 0.21-0.73). MSM with higher levels of psychological distress were significantly more likely to report that a family member said hurtful things to them (AOR = 1.80, 95 % CI 1.10-2.97), a parent or guardian had been physically abused (AOR = 3.51, 95 % CI 1.86-6.62), and a family member had been mentally ill (AOR = 4.01, 95 % CI 2.06-7.81) when they were growing up. In order to mitigate psychological distress among MSM in Cambodia, integration of mental health interventions within HIV programmes should be strengthened. To achieve optimal impact, these interventions should also address alcohol and other substance use, and low condom use among distressed MSM. In addition, training of clinical and non-clinical HIV service providers to screen for mental health symptoms, and subsequent provision of peer-based outreach and social support for MSM identified with psychological distress is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 188 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 18%
Researcher 31 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 11%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 27 14%
Unknown 43 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 14%
Social Sciences 23 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 2%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 53 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,823,675
of 8,702,492 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#456
of 767 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,045
of 273,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#19
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,702,492 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 767 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.