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Impact of a 3-year multi-centre community-based intervention on risk factors for chronic disease and obesity among free-living adults: the Healthy Alberta Communities study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of a 3-year multi-centre community-based intervention on risk factors for chronic disease and obesity among free-living adults: the Healthy Alberta Communities study
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3021-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellina Lytvyak, Dana Lee Olstad, Donald P. Schopflocher, Ronald C. Plotnikoff, Kate E. Storey, Candace I. J. Nykiforuk, Kim D. Raine

Abstract

Healthy Alberta Communities (HAC) was a 3-year community-based intervention to reduce lifestyle-related risk factors for chronic disease and obesity at a population-level. The current paper examines changes in blood pressure (BP) and anthropometric indicators within HAC communities compared to secular trends. Between 2006 and 2009, this community-academic partnership sought to create environments supportive of healthier dietary and physical activity behaviours within four diverse communities in Alberta, Canada. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference and BP were measured among 1554 and 1808 community residents at baseline (2006) and follow-up (2009), respectively. A comparison sample was drawn from a representative national survey. Samples were stratified by age and change between pre- and post-intervention was assessed using t-tests. Changes in parameters over time between groups were compared using meta-analysis. The net difference in change in outcomes (change in intervention communities minus change in comparison group) represented the effect of the intervention. Adjusted systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP declined within most age groups in HAC communities from pre- to post-intervention. The net decline in SBP was 1 mmHg in 20-39 year olds (p = 0.006) and 2 mmHg in 40-59 year olds (p = 0.001), while the net decline in DBP was 3 mmHg in 20-39 year olds (p < 0.001), 2 mmHg in 40-59 year olds (p < 0.001) and 3 mmHg in 60-79 year olds (p < 0.001). The net increase in the proportion of individuals with normal BP was 5.9 % (p < 0.001), while the net decline in the proportion of individuals with stage 1 hypertension was 4.5 % (p < 0.001). BMI and body weight were unchanged. There was a significant net increase in waist and hip circumference among 20-39 year olds within intervention communities. Findings suggest HAC succeeded in shifting the population distribution of BP in a leftward direction. By contrast, anthropometric parameters remained unchanged or worsened within intervention communities. Therefore, while improvements in some clinical risk factors can be achieved through relatively diffuse and shorter-term community-level environmental changes, improvements in others may require interventions of greater intensity and duration. Evaluating the success of community-based interventions based on their efficacy in changing individual-level clinical indicators may, however, underestimate their potential.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 18%
Student > Master 14 16%
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 16%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Psychology 5 6%
Sports and Recreations 4 5%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 23 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2017.
All research outputs
#748,298
of 12,219,921 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#844
of 8,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,147
of 276,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#27
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,921 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,270 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.