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Health personnel retention strategies in a peri-urban community: an exploratory study on Epworth, Zimbabwe

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2016
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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139 Mendeley
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Title
Health personnel retention strategies in a peri-urban community: an exploratory study on Epworth, Zimbabwe
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12960-016-0113-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernard Hope Taderera, Stephen Hendricks, Yogan Pillay

Abstract

The need to retain health personnel is a policy challenge undermining health system reform of the 21st century. The need to resolve this global health workforce crisis resulted in the First Global Forum on Human Resources for Health in 2008 from which the Kampala Declaration and Agenda for Global Action was formulated. However, whilst there have been several studies exploring the retention of health personnel towards this end, available literature does not provide a detailed narrative on strategies used in peri-urban communities. The aim of this study was to explore retention strategies implemented in a Zimbabwean peri-urban community between 2009 and 2014 and implications for peri-urban communities towards the health system reform agenda. The study was carried out in Epworth, a peri-urban community in Harare, Zimbabwe. The research design was a cross-sectional survey, in which qualitative methods were used in sampling, data collection, reporting and analysis. Qualitative tools were used to collect data through in-depth interviews with purposively selected health personnel managers at 10 local clinics and sample interviews with purposively selected healthcare workers who included registered general nurses, state-certified nurses, midwives, environmental health technicians, nurse aids and community health volunteers at each clinic. Two focus group discussions were carried out with community health volunteers. Qualitative data was subjected to thematic analysis, with coding being performed manually. A programme-specific strategic partnership between the government and donor community contributed towards the mobilisation of more health personnel, health facilities, worker development and remuneration. To complement this, the Ministry of Health intervened through the review and payment of salaries, support towards post-basic training and development, and protection. The local board, mission and donors contributed through the payment of top-up allowances and provision of non-monetary incentives. The review of salaries, engagement of international strategic partners, payment of top-up allowances, support towards post-basic training and development, mobilisation of more health personnel, non-monetary incentives and healthcare worker protection were critical towards the retention of health personnel in the Epworth peri-urban community between 2009 and 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 138 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 14%
Researcher 18 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 6%
Librarian 7 5%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 29 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 8%
Social Sciences 10 7%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 25 18%
Unknown 35 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2016.
All research outputs
#12,352,094
of 20,378,860 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#905
of 1,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,271
of 277,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#11
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,378,860 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,066 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.