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Serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and C-reactive protein in a group of Norwegian sled dogs during training and after endurance racing: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, April 2016
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Title
Serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and C-reactive protein in a group of Norwegian sled dogs during training and after endurance racing: a prospective cohort study
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13028-016-0204-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marte Ekeland Fergestad, Tuva Holt Jahr, Randi I. Krontveit, Ellen Skancke

Abstract

High incidences of gastritis and gastric ulceration are observed in sled dogs participating in endurance races. Exercise-induced increases in hormones like gastrin and cortisol have been suggested as possible contributing factors. An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) has also been observed in canines during physical exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long distance racing on the serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP in a group of sled dogs, by comparing the results achieved early in the training season and after participating in a long distance race; "Femundløpet". Dogs that only trained to the race, but did not compete in the race, were used as control dogs. Sixty-five sled dogs participated in the study; 46 competing dogs (25 completing and 21 non-completing the race) and 19 non-racing dogs (control dogs). The blood samples were collected in October 2012 and February 2013. The post-race serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP was significantly elevated in sled dogs participating in the race (both completing and non-completing dogs) when compared to the results from training. However, no significant differences were observed between the two sampling dates in the control dogs. Post-race results for completing and non-completing dogs were also compared. This demonstrated a significant elevation in gastrin in non-completing versus completing dogs, and a significant elevation in cortisol in completing compared to non-completing dogs. Participation in a long distance race was associated with a significant increase in serum gastrin, cortisol and CRP in sled dogs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 8 26%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 52%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Psychology 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2016.
All research outputs
#8,485,084
of 9,726,436 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#355
of 432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,143
of 276,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#11
of 16 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.