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Does the oxytocin receptor polymorphism (rs2254298) confer 'vulnerability' for psychopathology or 'differential susceptibility'? insights from evolution

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, April 2012
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2 tweeters

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183 Mendeley
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Title
Does the oxytocin receptor polymorphism (rs2254298) confer 'vulnerability' for psychopathology or 'differential susceptibility'? insights from evolution
Published in
BMC Medicine, April 2012
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-10-38
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Brüne

Abstract

The diathesis-stress model of psychiatric conditions has recently been challenged by the view that it might be more accurate to speak of 'differential susceptibility' or 'plasticity' genes, rather than one-sidedly focusing on individual vulnerability. That is, the same allelic variation that predisposes to a psychiatric disorder if associated with (developmentally early) environmental adversity may lead to a better-than-average functional outcome in the same domain under thriving (or favourable) environmental conditions. Studies of polymorphic variations of the serotonin transporter gene, the monoamino-oxidase-inhibitor A coding gene or the dopamine D4 receptor gene indicate that the early environment plays a crucial role in the development of favourable versus unfavourable outcomes. Current evidence is limited, however, to establishing a link between genetic variation and behavioural phenotypes. In contrast, little is known about how plasticity may be expressed at the neuroanatomical level as a 'hard-wired' correlate of observable behaviour. The present review article seeks to further strengthen the argument in favour of the differential susceptibility theory by incorporating findings from behavioural and neuroanatomical studies in relation to genetic variation of the oxytocin receptor gene. It is suggested that polymorphic variation at the oxytocin receptor gene (rs2254298) is associated with sociability, amygdala volume and differential risk for psychiatric conditions including autism, depression and anxiety disorder, depending on the quality of early environmental experiences. Seeing genetic variation at the core of developmental plasticity can explain, in contrast to the diathesis-stress perspective, why evolution by natural selection has maintained such 'risk' alleles in the gene pool of a population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Cuba 2 1%
Chile 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 171 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 19%
Researcher 31 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 13%
Student > Master 19 10%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Other 38 21%
Unknown 19 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 59 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 11%
Neuroscience 17 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 4%
Other 17 9%
Unknown 29 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2012.
All research outputs
#7,224,362
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,730
of 2,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,295
of 117,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#15
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,010 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.9. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.