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Early fatigue in cancer patients receiving PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors: an insight from clinical practice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2019
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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Early fatigue in cancer patients receiving PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors: an insight from clinical practice
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2019
DOI 10.1186/s12967-019-02132-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessio Cortellini, Maria G. Vitale, Federica De Galitiis, Francesca R. Di Pietro, Rossana Berardi, Mariangela Torniai, Michele De Tursi, Antonino Grassadonia, Pietro Di Marino, Daniele Santini, Tea Zeppola, Cecilia Anesi, Alain Gelibter, Mario Alberto Occhipinti, Andrea Botticelli, Paolo Marchetti, Francesca Rastelli, Federica Pergolesi, Marianna Tudini, Rosa Rita Silva, Domenico Mallardo, Vito Vanella, Corrado Ficorella, Giampiero Porzio, Paolo A. Ascierto

Abstract

Fatigue was reported as the most common any-grade adverse event (18.3%), and the most common grade 3 or higher immune-related adverse event (irAE) (0.89%) in patients receiving PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors in clinical trial. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to evaluate the correlations between "early ir-fatigue", "delayed ir-fatigue", and clinical outcomes in cancer patients receiving PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in clinical practice. 517 patients were evaluated. After the 12-weeks landmark selection, 386 (74.7%) patients were eligible for the clinical outcomes analysis. 40.4% were NSCLC, 42.2% were melanoma, 15.3% renal cell carcinoma and 2.1% other malignancies. 76 patients (19.7%) experienced early ir-fatigue (within 1 month from treatment commencement), while 150 patients (38.9%) experienced delayed ir-fatigue. Early ir-fatigue was significantly related to shortened PFS (HR = 2.29 [95% CI 1.62-3.22], p < 0.0001) and OS (HR = 2.32 [95% CI 1.59-3.38], p < 0.0001) at the multivariate analysis. On the other hand, we found a significant association between the occurrence of early ir-fatigue, ECOG-PS ≥ 2 (p < 0.0001), and disease burden (p = 0.0003). Delayed ir-fatigue was not significantly related to PFS nor OS. Early ir-fatigue seems to be negative prognostic parameter, but to proper weight its role we must to consider the predominant role of performance status, which was related to early ir-fatigue in the study population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 18%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 12 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 13 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2019.
All research outputs
#12,370,096
of 16,219,196 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,309
of 3,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,552
of 276,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#152
of 316 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,219,196 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,685 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 316 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.