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Initial characterization, dosimetric benchmark and performance validation of Dynamic Wave Arc

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, April 2016
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Title
Initial characterization, dosimetric benchmark and performance validation of Dynamic Wave Arc
Published in
Radiation Oncology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13014-016-0633-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manuela Burghelea, Dirk Verellen, Kenneth Poels, Cecilia Hung, Mitsuhiro Nakamura, Jennifer Dhont, Thierry Gevaert, Robbe Van den Begin, Christine Collen, Yukinori Matsuo, Takahiro Kishi, Viorica Simon, Masahiro Hiraoka, Mark de Ridder

Abstract

Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) is a clinical approach designed to maximize the versatility of Vero SBRT system by synchronizing the gantry-ring noncoplanar movement with D-MLC optimization. The purpose of this study was to verify the delivery accuracy of DWA approach and to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits. DWA is an extended form of VMAT with a continuous varying ring position. The main difference in the optimization modules of VMAT and DWA is during the angular spacing, where the DWA algorithm does not consider the gantry spacing, but only the Euclidian norm of the ring and gantry angle. A preclinical version of RayStation v4.6 (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) was used to create patient specific wave arc trajectories for 31 patients with various anatomical tumor regions (prostate, oligometatstatic cases, centrally-located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and locally advanced pancreatic cancer-LAPC). DWA was benchmarked against the current clinical approaches and coplanar VMAT. Each plan was evaluated with regards to dose distribution, modulation complexity (MCS), monitor units and treatment time efficiency. The delivery accuracy was evaluated using a 2D diode array that takes in consideration the multi-dimensionality of DWA during dose reconstruction. In centrally-located NSCLC cases, DWA improved the low dose spillage with 20 %, while the target coverage was increased with 17 % compared to 3D CRT. The structures that significantly benefited from using DWA were proximal bronchus and esophagus, with the maximal dose being reduced by 17 % and 24 %, respectively. For prostate and LAPC, neither technique seemed clearly superior to the other; however, DWA reduced with more than 65 % of the delivery time over IMRT. A steeper dose gradient outside the target was observed for all treatment sites (p < 0.01) with DWA. Except the oligometastatic cases, where the DWA-MCSs indicate a higher modulation, both DWA and VMAT modalities provide plans of similar complexity. The average ɣ (3 % /3 mm) passing rate for DWA plans was 99.2 ± 1 % (range from 96.8 to 100 %). DWA proven to be a fully functional treatment technique, allowing additional flexibility in dose shaping, while preserving dosimetrically robust delivery and treatment times comparable with coplanar VMAT.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 4%
France 1 2%
Unknown 47 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 52%
Physics and Astronomy 8 16%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2016.
All research outputs
#14,822,220
of 18,527,307 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#1,230
of 1,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,068
of 271,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
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