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A case report: A rare case of infant gastrointestinal canthariasis caused by larvae of Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2016
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4 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
A case report: A rare case of infant gastrointestinal canthariasis caused by larvae of Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0129-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xi Sun, Li-Fu Wang, Ying Feng, Hui Xie, Xiao-Ying Zheng, Ai He, Md Robiul Karim, Zhi-Yue Lv, Zhong-Dao Wu, Sun, Xi, Wang, Li-Fu, Feng, Ying, Xie, Hui, Zheng, Xiao-Ying, He, Ai, Karim, Md Robiul, Lv, Zhi-Yue, Wu, Zhong-Dao

Abstract

Canthariasis is a disease of humans caused by the infestation of beetle larvae. It is the second important insectal disease after myiasis. Several species of beetles are reported to cause the disease in gastrointestinal tract, urogenital system, nasal sinuses, ears and faces of mammals. The cigarette beetle Lasioderma serricorne is a widespread and destructive pest that usually feeds on tobacco, tea, beans, cereal grains, and animal and plant specimen. While there was no previous evidence of human infestation by this worm, we report the first case of L. serricorne infestation in a baby girl in China. Here the case, an eight-month-old baby girl with irritable feeling, rubbing eyes, history of contact with mud and eating oranges twice during five days before attendance, and having "worms" in her stool was admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. The clinical examination revealed that the pulse rate, blood pressure and temperature were regular, and the examination of the head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. The stool specimens containing "worms" were sent to the Department of Parasitology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University. The worms were recovered, studied morphologically using naked eyes and anatomical lens, PCR analyzed targeting cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) and 18S rRNA genes, examined by sequence analyses of the PCR products and finally classified by phylogenetic analysis to identify their species. Based on the findings, the worms were diagnosed as the larvae of L. serricorne. This report implies that the baby had an infestation with the larvae of L. serricorne in the gastrointestine. During contact with mud or eating oranges by the girl, worm eggs were swallowed into the stomach and resisted gastric acid digestion which eventually hatched into larvae and caused canthariasis. The 8 months girl had underdeveloped immune system which might facilitate the disease. This report implicates that L. serricorne can infest human accidentally and cause canthariasis that may lead to severe damage to infant and older patient upon involvement of important organs of the body. The patients once diagnosed having canthariasis should be treated in time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,741,347
of 7,657,182 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#145
of 274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,161
of 266,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#12
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,657,182 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 274 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,460 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.