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Thermal manipulation of the chicken embryo triggers differential gene expression in response to a later heat challenge

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

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1 tweeter
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2 patents

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Thermal manipulation of the chicken embryo triggers differential gene expression in response to a later heat challenge
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2661-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Loyau, Christelle Hennequet-Antier, Vincent Coustham, Cécile Berri, Marie Leduc, Sabine Crochet, Mélanie Sannier, Michel Jacques Duclos, Sandrine Mignon-Grasteau, Sophie Tesseraud, Aurélien Brionne, Sonia Métayer-Coustard, Marco Moroldo, Jérôme Lecardonnel, Patrice Martin, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Shlomo Yahav, Anne Collin

Abstract

Meat type chickens have limited capacities to cope with high environmental temperatures, this sometimes leading to mortality on farms and subsequent economic losses. A strategy to alleviate this problem is to enhance adaptive capacities to face heat exposure using thermal manipulation (TM) during embryogenesis. This strategy was shown to improve thermotolerance during their life span. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of TM (39.5 °C, 12 h/24 vs 37.8 °C from d7 to d16 of embryogenesis) and of a subsequent heat challenge (32 °C for 5 h) applied on d34 on gene expression in the Pectoralis major muscle (PM). A chicken gene expression microarray (8 × 60 K) was used to compare muscle gene expression profiles of Control (C characterized by relatively high body temperatures, Tb) and TM chickens (characterized by a relatively low Tb) reared at 21 °C and at 32 °C (CHC and TMHC, respectively) in a dye-swap design with four comparisons and 8 broilers per treatment. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was subsequently performed to validate differential expression in each comparison. Gene ontology, clustering and network building strategies were then used to identify pathways affected by TM and heat challenge. Among the genes differentially expressed (DE) in the PM (1.5 % of total probes), 28 were found to be differentially expressed between C and TM, 128 between CHC and C, and 759 between TMHC and TM. No DE gene was found between TMHC and CHC broilers. The majority of DE genes analyzed by RT-qPCR were validated. In the TM/C comparison, DE genes were involved in energy metabolism and mitochondrial function, cell proliferation, vascularization and muscle growth; when comparing heat-exposed chickens to their own controls, TM broilers developed more specific pathways than C, especially involving genes related to metabolism, stress response, vascularization, anti-apoptotic and epigenetic processes. This study improved the understanding of the long-term effects of TM on PM muscle. TM broilers displaying low Tb may have lower metabolic intensity in the muscle, resulting in decreased metabolic heat production, whereas modifications in vascularization may enhance heat loss. These specific changes could in part explain the better adaptation of TM broilers to heat.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 27%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 5%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2020.
All research outputs
#3,748,798
of 18,942,198 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,720
of 9,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,039
of 272,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#5
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,942,198 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,671 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,580 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.