↓ Skip to main content

Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2012
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-11-140
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rashid A Khatib, Jacek Skarbinski, Joseph D Njau, Catherine A Goodman, Berty F Elling, Elizeus Kahigwa, Jacquelin M Roberts, John R MacArthur, Julie R Gutman, Abdunoor M Kabanywanyi, Ernest E Smith, Masha F Somi, Thomas Lyimo, Alex Mwita, Blaise Genton, Marcel Tanner, Anne Mills, Hassan Mshinda, Peter B Bloland, Salim M Abdulla, S Patrick Kachur

Abstract

Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 4 4%
United States 2 2%
Australia 1 1%
Indonesia 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 84 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 22 23%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 40%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Mathematics 3 3%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2012.
All research outputs
#6,743,980
of 12,445,334 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,120
of 3,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,000
of 117,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#24
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,445,334 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,916 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.