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GNAS mutations as prognostic biomarker in patients with relapsed peritoneal pseudomyxoma receiving metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab: a clinical and translational study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
GNAS mutations as prognostic biomarker in patients with relapsed peritoneal pseudomyxoma receiving metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab: a clinical and translational study
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0877-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Filippo Pietrantonio, Rosa Berenato, Claudia Maggi, Marta Caporale, Massimo Milione, Federica Perrone, Elena Tamborini, Dario Baratti, Shigeki Kusamura, Luigi Mariani, Monica Niger, Alessia Mennitto, Annunziata Gloghini, Ilaria Bossi, Giulio Settanni, Adele Busico, Pietro Francesco Bagnoli, Maria Di Bartolomeo, Marcello Deraco, Filippo de Braud

Abstract

There is lack of evidence about systemic treatment of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) relapsing after cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. There is also lack of biomarkers able to predict outcomes beyond known clinical and pathological prognostic features. Fifteen patients with relapsed PMP and progressive disease within the last 6 months were included and received metronomic capecitabine (625 mg/mq/day b.i.d.) and bevacizumab (7.5 mg/Kg three-weekly) until progressive disease/unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Ion Torrent(®) next generation sequencing technology (Hot-spot Cancer Panel) was used to characterize molecular features. At a median follow up of 12 months, median PFS was 8.2 months and 1-year overall survival was 91 %. Partial responses were observed in 20 % of cases, but a significant reduction of tumor markers in up to 79 %. Treatment was very well tolerated without no new safety signals. All tumor samples except one had KRAS mutations. Patients with GNAS mutations had a significantly shorter median PFS as compared to GNAS wild-type ones (5.3 months vs. not reached; p < 0.007). The results were externally validated on our previous series of PMP patients. GNAS mutations were rare in a parallel cohort of 121 advanced colorectal cancers (2.5 %), but were associated with peculiar clinical-pathological features and aggressive course. Metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab is an active and well tolerated option in patients with relapsed PMP. The negative prognostic effect of GNAS mutations in gastrointestinal cancers warrants further confirmatory studies and may prompt the development of effective targeted strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Other 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 14%
Unspecified 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,204,100
of 7,667,486 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#537
of 1,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,809
of 266,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#38
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,667,486 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,725 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.