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Early life programming of pain: focus on neuroimmune to endocrine communication

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Early life programming of pain: focus on neuroimmune to endocrine communication
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0879-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Zouikr, M. D. Bartholomeusz, D. M. Hodgson

Abstract

Chronic pain constitutes a challenge for the scientific community and a significant economic and social cost for modern societies. Given the failure of current drugs to effectively treat chronic pain, which are based on suppressing aberrant neuronal excitability, we propose in this review an integrated approach that views pain not solely originating from neuronal activation but also the result of a complex interaction between the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Pain assessment must also extend beyond measures of behavioural responses to noxious stimuli to a more developmentally informed assessment given the significant plasticity of the nociceptive system during the neonatal period. Finally integrating the concept of perinatal programming into the pain management field is a necessary step to develop and target interventions to reduce the suffering associated with chronic pain. We present clinical and animal findings from our laboratory (and others) demonstrating the importance of the microbial and relational environment in programming pain responsiveness later in life via action on hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis activity, peripheral and central immune system, spinal and supraspinal mechanisms, and the autonomic nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 70 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Neuroscience 10 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 13%
Psychology 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 18 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2019.
All research outputs
#2,019,372
of 16,502,572 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#314
of 3,094 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,178
of 266,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,502,572 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,094 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them