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Sub-sensory vibratory noise augments the physiologic complexity of postural control in older adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, May 2016
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Title
Sub-sensory vibratory noise augments the physiologic complexity of postural control in older adults
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12984-016-0152-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Junhong Zhou, Lewis Lipsitz, Daniel Habtemariam, Brad Manor

Abstract

Postural control requires numerous inputs interacting across multiple temporospatial scales. This organization, evidenced by the "complexity" contained within standing postural sway fluctuations, enables diverse system functionality. Age-related reduction of foot-sole somatosensation reduces standing postural sway complexity and diminishes the functionality of the postural control system. Sub-sensory vibrations applied to the foot soles reduce the speed and magnitude of sway and improve mobility in older adults. We thus hypothesized that these vibration-induced improvements to the functionality of the postural control system are associated with an increase in the standing postural sway complexity. Twelve healthy older adults aged 74 ± 8 years completed three visits to test the effects of foot sole vibrations at 0 % (i.e., no vibration), 70 and 85 % of the sensory threshold. Postural sway was assessed during eyes-open and eyes-closed standing. The complexity of sway time-series was quantified using multiscale entropy. The timed up-and-go (TUG) was completed to assess mobility. When standing without vibration, participants with lower foot sole vibratory thresholds (better sensation) had greater mediolateral (ML) sway complexity (r (2) = 0.49, p < 0.001), and those with greater ML sway complexity had faster TUG times (better mobility) (r (2) = 0.38, p < 0.001). Foot sole vibrations at 70 and 85 % of sensory threshold increased ML sway complexity during eyes-open and eyes-closed standing (p < 0.0001). Importantly, these vibration-induced increases in complexity correlated with improvements in the TUG test of mobility (r (2) = 0.15 ~ 0.42, p < 0.001 ~ 0.03). Sub-sensory foot sole vibrations augment the postural control system functionality and such beneficial effects are reflected in an increase in the physiologic complexity of standing postural sway dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 57 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 10 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Neuroscience 8 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2016.
All research outputs
#12,717,722
of 16,663,134 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#727
of 1,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,013
of 266,753 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,663,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,015 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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