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Ambient Assistive Technologies (AAT): socio-technology as a powerful tool for facing the inevitable sociodemographic challenges?

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, January 2010
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Ambient Assistive Technologies (AAT): socio-technology as a powerful tool for facing the inevitable sociodemographic challenges?
Published in
Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1747-5341-5-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Astrid M Schulke, Herbert Plischke, Niko B Kohls

Abstract

Due to the socio-demographic change in most developed western countries, elderly populations have been continuously increasing. Therefore, preventive and assistive systems that allow elderly people to independently live in their own homes as long as possible will become an economical if not ethical necessity. These respective technologies are being developed under the term "Ambient Assistive Technologies" (AAT). The EU-funded AAT-project Ambient Lighting Assistance for an Ageing Population (ALADIN) has established the long-term goal to create an adaptive system capable of improving the residential lighting conditions of single living elderly persons also aiming at supporting the preservation of their independence.Results of an earlier survey revealed that the elderly perceived their current lighting situation as satisfactory, whereas interviewers assessed in-house lighting as too dark and risk-laden. The overall results of ALADIN showed a significant increase in well-being from the baseline final testing with the new adaptive lighting system.Positive results for wellbeing and life quality suggest that the outcome effects may be attributed to the introduction of technology as well as to social contacts arising from participating in the study. The technological guidance of the study supervisors, in particular, may have produced a strong social reactivity effect that was first observed in the famous Hawthorne experiments in the 1930s. As older adults seem to benefit both from meaningful social contacts as well as assistive technologies, the question arises how assistive technology can be socially embedded to be able to maximize positive health effects. Therefore ethical guidelines for development and use of new assistive technologies for handicapped/older persons have to be developed and should be discussed with regard to their applicability in the context of AAT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Brazil 1 2%
Pakistan 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Jamaica 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 54 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 8 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Social Sciences 10 16%
Computer Science 8 13%
Psychology 6 10%
Engineering 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 11 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2018.
All research outputs
#4,339,850
of 16,939,817 outputs
Outputs from Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine
#123
of 199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,785
of 131,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,939,817 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 199 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them