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Tumor characterization and treatment monitoring of postsurgical human breast specimens using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, May 2016
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3 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Tumor characterization and treatment monitoring of postsurgical human breast specimens using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0707-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yang Han, Shutao Wang, Hanina Hibshoosh, Bret Taback, Elisa Konofagou

Abstract

High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive technique used in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer and benign tumors. To facilitate its translation to the clinic, there is a need for a simple, cost-effective device that can reliably monitor HIFU treatment. We have developed harmonic motion imaging (HMI), which can be used seamlessly in conjunction with HIFU for tumor ablation monitoring, namely harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU). The overall objective of this study was to develop an all ultrasound-based system for real-time imaging and ablation monitoring in the human breast in vivo. HMI was performed in 36 specimens (19 normal, 15 invasive ductal carcinomas, and 2 fibroadenomas) immediately after surgical removal. The specimens were securely embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar gel matrix and submerged in degassed phosphate-buffered saline to mimic in vivo environment. The HMI setup consisted of a HIFU transducer confocally aligned with an imaging transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force and estimate the resulting displacement. 3D HMI displacement maps were reconstructed to represent the relative tissue stiffness in 3D. The average peak-to-peak displacement was found to be significantly different (p = 0.003) between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma. There were also significant differences before and after HMIFU ablation in both the normal (53.84 % decrease) and invasive ductal carcinoma (44.69 % decrease) specimens. HMI can be used to map and differentiate relative stiffness in postsurgical normal and pathological breast tissues. HMIFU can also successfully monitor thermal ablations in normal and pathological human breast specimens. This HMI technique may lead to a new clinical tool for breast tumor imaging and HIFU treatment monitoring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 29%
Researcher 9 29%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 9 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Physics and Astronomy 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2016.
All research outputs
#10,270,416
of 16,669,654 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#1,173
of 1,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,123
of 266,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#7
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,669,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,699 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.