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Psychometric properties of the 7-item game addiction scale among french and German speaking adults

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, May 2016
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Title
Psychometric properties of the 7-item game addiction scale among french and German speaking adults
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0836-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasser Khazaal, Anne Chatton, Stephane Rothen, Sophia Achab, Gabriel Thorens, Daniele Zullino, Gerhard Gmel

Abstract

The 7-item Game Addiction Scale (GAS) is a used to screen for addictive game use. Both cross cross-linguistic validation and validation in French and German is needed in adult samples. The objective of the study is to assess the factorial structure of the French and German versions of the GAS among adults. Two samples of men from French (N = 3318) and German (N = 2665) language areas of Switzerland were assessed with the GAS, the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale, and the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ-50-cc). They were also assessed for cannabis and alcohol use. The internal consistency of the scale was satisfactory (Cronbach α = 0.85). A one-factor solution was found in both samples. Small and positive associations were found between GAS scores and the MDI, as well as the Neuroticism-Anxiety and Aggression-Hostility subscales of the ZKPQ-50-cc. A small negative association was found with the ZKPQ-50-cc Sociability subscale. The GAS, in its French and German versions, is appropriate for the assessment of game addiction among adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 154 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 154 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 29 19%
Student > Master 21 14%
Researcher 18 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 27 18%
Unknown 33 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 54 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 12%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Neuroscience 5 3%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 35 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2016.
All research outputs
#11,038,715
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,514
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,574
of 263,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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