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Insights into the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria in Ghana: the role of caregivers and licensed chemical sellers in four regions

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
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Title
Insights into the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria in Ghana: the role of caregivers and licensed chemical sellers in four regions
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1307-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew A. Adjei, Peter Winch, Amos Laar, David J. Sullivan, Kwame S. Sakyi, Judith K. Stephens, George O. Adjei, Isaac A. Boateng, Vivian N. Ama Aubyn, Chrysantus Kubio, Julliette Tuakli, Linda Vanotoo, Bernard B. Bortei, Maame Amo-Addae, Felix Sorvor, Nathaniel Coleman, Sarah Dalglish, Richmond Owusu, Tsega Gebreyesus, Edward Essuman, Rebecca Greene, Ezekiel Ankomah, Kiely Houston, Constance Bart-Plange, Samuel Salamat, Ebenezer A. Addison, Isabella A. Quakyi

Abstract

The Affordable Medicine Facility-malaria (AMFm) was an innovative global financing mechanism for the provision of quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) across both the private and public health sectors in eight countries in sub-Saharan Africa. This study evaluated the effectiveness of AMFm subsidies in increasing access to ACT in Ghana and documented malaria management practices at the household and community levels during the implementation of the AMFm. This study, conducted in four regions in Ghana between January, 2011 to December, 2012, employed cross-sectional mixed-methods design that included qualitative and quantitative elements, specifically household surveys, focus group discussions (FGD) and in-depth interviews. The study indicated high ACT availability, adequate provider knowledge and reasonably low quality-assured ACT use in the study areas, all of which are a reflection of a high market share of ACT in these hard-to-reach areas of the country. Adequate recognition of childhood malaria symptoms by licensed chemical seller (LCS) attendants was observed. A preference by caregivers for LCS over health facilities for seeking treatment solutions to childhood malaria was found. Artemisinin-based combination therapy with the AMFm logo was accessible and affordable for most people seeking treatment from health facilities and LCS shops in rural areas. Caregivers and LCS were seen to play key roles in the health of the community especially with children under 5 years of age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 23%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 21 20%
Unknown 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 6%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 32 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,758,864
of 11,130,136 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,025
of 3,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,980
of 276,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#45
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,130,136 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,335 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.