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Lactation undernutrition leads to multigenerational molecular programming of hypothalamic gene networks controlling reproduction

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Lactation undernutrition leads to multigenerational molecular programming of hypothalamic gene networks controlling reproduction
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2615-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monika M. Kaczmarek, Tamra Mendoza, Leslie P. Kozak

Abstract

Reproductive success is dependent on development of hypothalamic circuits involving many hormonal systems working in concert to regulate gonadal function and sexual behavior. The timing of pubertal initiation and progression in mammals is likely influenced by the nutritional and metabolic state, leading us to the hypothesis that transient malnutrition experienced at critical times during development may perturb pubertal progression through successive generations. To test this hypothesis we have utilized a mouse model of undernutrition during suckling by exposing lactating mothers to undernutrition. Using a combination of transcriptomic and biological approaches, we demonstrate that molecular programming of hypothalamus may perturb gender specific phenotypes across generations that are dependent on the nutritional environment of the lactation period. Lactation undernutrition in first (F1) generation offspring affected body composition, reproductive performance parameters and influenced the expression of genes responsible for hypothalamic neural circuits controlling reproductive function of both sexes. Strikingly, F2 offspring showed phenotypes similar to F1 progeny; however, they were sex and parental nutritional history specific. Here, we showed that deregulated expression of genes involved in kisspeptin signaling within the hypothalamus is strongly associated with a delay in the attainment of puberty in F1 and F2 male and female offspring. The early developmental plasticity of hypothalamus when challenged with undernutrition during postnatal development not only leads to altered expression of genes controlling hypothalamic neural circuits, altered body composition, delayed puberty and disturbed reproductive performance in F1 progeny, but also affects F2 offspring, depending on parental malnutrition history and in sexually dimorphic manner.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Psychology 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,398,788
of 17,824,880 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,760
of 9,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,498
of 271,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#7
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,824,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,429 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.