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Clinical and epidemiological analysis of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus infections in humans and comparative genetic analysis with strains isolated from cattle

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical and epidemiological analysis of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus infections in humans and comparative genetic analysis with strains isolated from cattle
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1538-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Escher, Colette Brunner, Niklaus von Steiger, Isabelle Brodard, Sara Droz, Carlos Abril, Peter Kuhnert

Abstract

Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus (CFF) is an important pathogen for both cattle and humans. We performed a systematic epidemiological and clinical study of patients and evaluated the genetic relatedness of 17 human and 17 bovine CFF isolates by using different genotyping methods. In addition, the serotype, the dissemination of the genomic island containing a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and resistance determinants for tetracycline and streptomycin were also evaluated. The isolates from patients diagnosed with CFF infection as well as those from faecal samples of healthy calves were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), as well as single locus sequence typing (SLST) targeting cmp1 and cmp2 genes encoding two major outer membrane proteins in CFF. The presence of the genomic island and identification of serotype was determined by PCRs targeting genes of the T4SS and the sap locus, respectively. Tetracycline and streptomycin resistance phenotypes were determined by minimal inhibitory concentration. Clinical data obtained from medical records and laboratory data were supplemented by data obtained via telephone interviews with the patients and treating physicians. PFGE analysis defined two major clusters; cluster A containing 16 bovine (80 %) isolates and cluster B containing 13 human (92 %) isolates, suggesting a host preference. Further genotypic analysis using MLST, SLST as well as sap and T4SS PCR showed the presence of genotypically identical isolates in cattle and humans. The low diversity observed within the cmp alleles of CFF corroborates the clonal nature of this pathogen. The genomic island containing the tetracycline and streptomycin resistance determinants was found in 55 % of the isolates in cluster A and correlated with phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Most human and bovine isolates were separated on two phylogenetic clusters. However, several human and bovine isolates were identical by diverse genotyping methods, indicating a possible link between strains from these two hosts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 19%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 25 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#5,349,093
of 20,867,471 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,562
of 7,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,946
of 279,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,867,471 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them