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Tackling inequalities in obesity: a protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of public health interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst children

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Reviews, February 2012
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Title
Tackling inequalities in obesity: a protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of public health interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst children
Published in
Systematic Reviews, February 2012
DOI 10.1186/2046-4053-1-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clare L Bambra, Frances C Hillier, Helen J Moore, Carolyn D Summerbell

Abstract

There is growing evidence of the impact of overweight and obesity on short- and long-term functioning, health and well-being. Internationally, childhood obesity rates continue to rise in some countries (for example, Mexico, India, China and Canada), although there is emerging evidence of a slowing of this increase or a plateauing in some age groups. In most European countries, the United States and Australia, however, socioeconomic inequalities in relation to obesity and risk factors for obesity are widening. Addressing inequalities in obesity, therefore, has a very high profile on the public health and health services agendas. However, there is a lack of accessible policy-ready evidence on what works in terms of interventions to reduce inequalities in obesity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 218 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
Czechia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 211 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 20%
Researcher 31 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 12%
Student > Bachelor 21 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 47 22%
Unknown 33 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 30%
Social Sciences 34 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 13%
Psychology 15 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 3%
Other 30 14%
Unknown 39 18%