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Red cell distribution width improves the simplified acute physiology score for risk prediction in unselected critically ill patients

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2012
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3 tweeters

Citations

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90 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Red cell distribution width improves the simplified acute physiology score for risk prediction in unselected critically ill patients
Published in
Critical Care, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/cc11351
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabina Hunziker, Leo A Celi, Joon Lee, Michael D Howell

Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Recently, red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of erythrocyte size variability, has been shown to be a prognostic marker in critical illness. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adding RDW has the potential to improve the prognostic performance of the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) to predict short- and long-term mortality in an independent, large, and unselected population of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. METHODS: This observational cohort study includes 17,922 ICU patients with available RDW measurements from different types of ICUs. We modeled the association between RDW and mortality by using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidities, hematocrit, and severity of illness by using the SAPS. RESULTS: ICU-, in-hospital-, and 1-year mortality rates in the 17,922 included patients were 7.6% (95% CI, 7.2 to 8.0), 11.2% (95% CI, 10.8 to 11.7), and 25.4% (95% CI, 24.8 to 26.1). RDW was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (OR per 1% increase in RDW (95%CI)) (1.14 (1.08 to 1.19), P < 0.0001), ICU mortality (1.10 (1.06 to 1.15), P < 0.0001), and 1-year mortality (1.20 (95% CI, 1.14 to 1.26); P < 0.001). Adding RDW to SAPS significantly improved the AUC from 0.746 to 0.774 (P < 0.001) for in-hospital mortality and 0.793 to 0.805 (P < 0.001) for ICU mortality. Significant improvements in classification of SAPS were confirmed in reclassification analyses. Subgroups demonstrated robust results for gender, age categories, SAPS categories, anemia, hematocrit categories, and renal failure. CONCLUSIONS: RDW is a promising independent short- and long-term prognostic marker in ICU patients and significantly improves risk stratification of SAPS. Further research is needed the better to understand the pathophysiology underlying these effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Brazil 2 3%
France 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 72 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Master 9 12%
Other 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 21 27%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 54%
Computer Science 6 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2020.
All research outputs
#10,410,882
of 17,411,817 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#4,041
of 5,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,303
of 133,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#33
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,411,817 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,326 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.