↓ Skip to main content

The DARE study of relapse prevention in depression: design for a phase 1/2 translational randomised controlled trial involving mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and supported self monitoring

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, January 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
261 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The DARE study of relapse prevention in depression: design for a phase 1/2 translational randomised controlled trial involving mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and supported self monitoring
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-244x-12-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frances Shawyer, Graham N Meadows, Fiona Judd, Paul R Martin, Zindel Segal, Leon Piterman

Abstract

Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing depressive relapse. While trials of MBCT to date have met the core requirements of phase 1 translational research, there is a need now to move to phase 2 translational research - the application of MBCT within real-world settings with a view to informing policy and clinical practice. The aim of this trial is to examine the clinical impact and health economics of MBCT under real-world conditions and where efforts have been made to assess for and prevent resentful demoralization among the control group. Secondary aims of the project involve extending the phase 1 agenda to an examination of the effects of co-morbidity and mechanisms of action.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 261 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 251 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 17%
Researcher 38 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 10%
Student > Postgraduate 22 8%
Other 56 21%
Unknown 31 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 120 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 16%
Social Sciences 15 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 3%
Neuroscience 6 2%
Other 30 11%
Unknown 40 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2012.
All research outputs
#14,146,599
of 22,668,244 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,009
of 4,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,778
of 245,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#21
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,668,244 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,633 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.