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Cholecystokinin enhances visceral pain-related affective memory via vagal afferent pathway in rats

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Cholecystokinin enhances visceral pain-related affective memory via vagal afferent pathway in rats
Published in
Molecular Brain, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1756-6606-5-19
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bing Cao, Xu Zhang, Ni Yan, Shengliang Chen, Ying Li

Abstract

Pain contains both sensory and affective dimensions. Using a rodent visceral pain assay that combines the colorectal distension (CRD) model with the conditioned place avoidance (CPA) paradigms, we measured a learned behavior that directly reflects the affective component of visceral pain, and showed that perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) activation is critical for memory processing involved in long-term visceral affective state and prediction of aversive stimuli by contextual cue. Progress has been made and suggested that activation of vagal afferents plays a role in the behavioral control nociception and memory storage processes.In human patients, electrical vagus nerve stimulation enhanced retention of verbal learning performance. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK), which is a gastrointestinal hormone released during feeding, has been shown to enhance memory retention. Mice access to food immediately after training session enhanced memory retention. It has been well demonstrated that CCK acting on vagal afferent fibers mediates various physiological functions. We hypothesize that CCK activation of vagal afferent enhances visceral pain-related affective memory.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Hong Kong 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 63 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 18%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Psychology 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2019.
All research outputs
#3,954,691
of 22,668,244 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#226
of 1,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,023
of 244,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#6
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,668,244 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.