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Improving the uptake of pre-travel health advice amongst migrant Australians: exploring the attitudes of primary care providers and migrant community groups

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
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Title
Improving the uptake of pre-travel health advice amongst migrant Australians: exploring the attitudes of primary care providers and migrant community groups
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1479-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Holly Seale, Rajneesh Kaur, Abela Mahimbo, C. Raina MacIntyre, Nicholas Zwar, Mitchell Smith, Heather Worth, Anita E Heywood

Abstract

Migrant travellers who return to their country of origin to visit family and friends (VFR) are less likely to seek travel-related medical care and are less likely to adhere to recommended medications and travel precautions. Through this study, we aimed to get an understanding of the views of stakeholders from community migrant centres and primary care providers on barriers for migrants, particularly from non-English speaking backgrounds, in accessing travel health advice and the strategies that could be used to engage them. A qualitative study involving 20 semi-structured interviews was undertaken in Sydney, Australia between January 2013 and September 2014. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Language barriers, a lower perceived risk of travel-related infections and the financial costs of seeking pre-travel health care were nominated as being the key barriers impacting on the uptake of pre-travel health advice and precautions. To overcome pre-existing language barriers, participants advocated for the use of bilingual community educators, community radio, ethnic newspapers and posters in the dissemination of pre-travel health information. Travel is a major vector of importation of infectious diseases into Australia, and VFR travellers are at high risk of infection. Collaboration between the Government, primary care physicians, migrant community groups and migrants themselves is crucial if we are to be successful in reducing travel-related risks among this subgroup of travellers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 8 16%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 20%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 13 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,680,800
of 7,722,452 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,137
of 3,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,086
of 268,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#121
of 153 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,722,452 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,466 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 153 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.