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Developed-developing country partnerships: Benefits to developed countries?

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
109 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
326 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Developed-developing country partnerships: Benefits to developed countries?
Published in
Globalization and Health, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-8-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shamsuzzoha B Syed, Viva Dadwal, Paul Rutter, Julie Storr, Joyce D Hightower, Rachel Gooden, Jean Carlet, Sepideh Nejad, Edward T Kelley, Liam Donaldson, Didier Pittet

Abstract

Developing countries can generate effective solutions for today's global health challenges. This paper reviews relevant literature to construct the case for international cooperation, and in particular, developed-developing country partnerships. Standard database and web-based searches were conducted for publications in English between 1990 and 2010. Studies containing full or partial data relating to international cooperation between developed and developing countries were retained for further analysis. Of 227 articles retained through initial screening, 65 were included in the final analysis. The results were two-fold: some articles pointed to intangible benefits accrued by developed country partners, but the majority of information pointed to developing country innovations that can potentially inform health systems in developed countries. This information spanned all six WHO health system components. Ten key health areas where developed countries have the most to learn from the developing world were identified and include, rural health service delivery; skills substitution; decentralisation of management; creative problem-solving; education in communicable disease control; innovation in mobile phone use; low technology simulation training; local product manufacture; health financing; and social entrepreneurship. While there are no guarantees that innovations from developing country experiences can effectively transfer to developed countries, combined developed-developing country learning processes can potentially generate effective solutions for global health systems. However, the global pool of knowledge in this area is virgin and further work needs to be undertaken to advance understanding of health innovation diffusion. Even more urgently, a standardized method for reporting partnership benefits is needed--this is perhaps the single most immediate need in planning for, and realizing, the full potential of international cooperation between developed and developing countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 326 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 5 2%
United States 4 1%
India 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 312 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 67 21%
Researcher 48 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 12%
Student > Bachelor 37 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 10%
Other 73 22%
Unknown 29 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 76 23%
Social Sciences 56 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 34 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 8%
Engineering 16 5%
Other 76 23%
Unknown 43 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2020.
All research outputs
#482,338
of 17,805,015 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#55
of 912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,657
of 134,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,805,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 912 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 134,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them