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Stability of remission rates in a 3-year follow-up of naturalistic treated depressed inpatients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, May 2016
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Title
Stability of remission rates in a 3-year follow-up of naturalistic treated depressed inpatients
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0851-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Florian Seemüller, Michael Obermeier, Rebecca Schennach, Michael Bauer, Mazda Adli, Peter Brieger, Gerd Laux, Michael Riedel, Peter Falkai, Hans-Jürgen Möller

Abstract

Remission is a common outcome of short-term trials and the main goal of acute and longterm treatment. The longitudinal stability of remission has rarely been investigated under naturalistic treatment conditions. Naturalistic multisite follow-up study. Three-year symptomatic long-term outcome of initially hospitalized tertiary care patients (N = 784) with major depressive episodes. Remission rates as well as the switch rates between remission and non-remission were reported. After one, two and three years 62 %, 59 % and 69 % of the observed patients met criteria for remission. During the follow-up 88 % of all patients achieved remission. 36 % of maintained remission from discharge to 3-years, 12 % of all patients never reached remission and 52 % percent showed a fluctuating course switching from remission to non-remission and vice versa. There was considerable transition between remission and non-remission. For example, from discharge to 1 year, from 1 to 2, and from 2 to 3 years 25 %, 21 % and 11 % lost remission. Cumulative outcome rates are encouraging. Absolute rates at predefined endpoints as well as the fluctuations between these outcomes reflect the variable and chronic nature of major depression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 27%
Psychology 7 21%
Neuroscience 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2016.
All research outputs
#20,328,845
of 22,873,031 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#4,221
of 4,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#286,332
of 333,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#100
of 108 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.