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An evolutionary approach to identify potentially protective B cell epitopes involved in naturally acquired immunity to malaria and the role of EBA-175 in protection amongst denizens of Bolifamba…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
An evolutionary approach to identify potentially protective B cell epitopes involved in naturally acquired immunity to malaria and the role of EBA-175 in protection amongst denizens of Bolifamba, Cameroon
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1337-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raymond B. Nyasa, Helen K. Kimbi, Denis Zofou, Jeremy D. DeBarry, Jessica C. Kissinger, Vincent P. K. Titanji

Abstract

The search for a vaccine against malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum has lasted for more than 100 years, with considerable progress in the identification of a number of vaccine candidates. The post-genomic era offers new opportunities for an expedited search using rational vaccine design and prioritization of key B-cell epitopes involved in natural acquired immunity. Malaria vaccine candidate genes that have reached clinical trial were searched on an evolutionary relationship tree, to determine their level of lineage-specificity. Ten other genes with similar protein features and level of lineage specificity to the vaccine candidates were randomly selected, and computationally evaluated for the presence of B-cell epitopes. The protein fragment with maximum probability of putative epitopes were synthesized and used in an ELISA experiment to determine the presence of antibodies to these peptides, in the serum of malaria patients and healthy malaria uninfected inhabitants from a malaria endemic region (Bolifamba), alongside with a vaccine candidate EBA-175. Two peptide fragments of 25 and 30 amino acid length from PF3D7_1233400 and PF3D7_1437500 respectively, coded as PF4-123 and PF4-143 were shown to contain B-cell epitope(s). Total IgG antibodies to these peptides were not significantly different between sick and healthy participants, but cytophilic antibodies to these peptides were significantly higher in healthy participants (p < 0.03). Total IgG to the vaccine candidate EBA-175 was significantly higher in sick participants than in healthy participants, likewise cytophilic antibodies (p < 0.04). Antibodies to the peptides PF4-123 and PF4-143 correlated negatively (p = 0.025 and 0.008 and r = -0.291 and -0.345, respectively) to parasite load. Total IgG antibodies to EBA-175 showed a negative correlation to parasite load (r = -0.144), which was not significant (p = 0.276). Duration of stay in Bolifamba also negatively correlated with parasite load (p = 0.026, r = -0.419) and total IgG to PF4-143 was significantly associated with prolonged duration of stay in the locality of Bolifamba, Cameroon (p = 0.006, r = 0.361). The present study has identified two genes PF3D7_1233400 and PF3D7_1437500 containing peptide fragment (PF4-123 and PF4-143) with B-cell epitopes that are correlated with naturally acquired immunity to malaria. A pipeline has been developed for rapid identification of other B-cell epitopes involved in naturally acquired immunity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 15%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,547,378
of 19,457,256 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,623
of 5,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,609
of 276,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,457,256 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,100 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them