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Up-regulation of long non-coding RNA PANDAR is associated with poor prognosis and promotes tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, May 2016
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2 tweeters

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Up-regulation of long non-coding RNA PANDAR is associated with poor prognosis and promotes tumorigenesis in bladder cancer
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13046-016-0354-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yonghao Zhan, Junhao Lin, Yuchen Liu, Mingwei Chen, Xiaoying Chen, Chengle Zhuang, Li Liu, Wen Xu, Zhicong Chen, Anbang He, Qiaoxia Zhang, Xiaojuan Sun, Guoping Zhao, Weiren Huang

Abstract

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as biomarkers and important regulators of tumor development and progression. PANDAR (promoter of CDKN1A antisense DNA damage activated RNA) is a novel long non-coding RNA that acts as a potential biomarker and involves in development of multiple cancers. However, the clinical significance and molecular mechanism of PANDAR in bladder cancer is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to figure out the role of PANDAR in bladder cancer. The relative expression level of lncRNA PANDAR was determined by Real-Time qPCR in a total of 55 patients with urothelial bladder cancer and in different bladder cancer cell lines. We inhibited PANDAR expression by transfecting PANDAR specific siRNA and enhanced PANDAR expression by transfecting a PANDAR expression vector (pcDNA3.1-PANDAR). Cell proliferation was determined by using both CCK-8 assay and Edu assay. Cell apoptosis was determined by using ELISA assay, Hoechst 33342 staining and Flow cytometry. Cell migration was determined by using transwell assay. All experimental data from three independent experiments were analyzed by χ2 test or Student's t-test and results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that PANDAR was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues compared with paired-adjacent nontumorous tissues in a cohort of 55 bladder cancer patients. Moreover, increased PANDAR expression was positively correlated with higher histological grade (P < 0.05) and advanced TNM stage (P < 0.05). Further experiments demonstrated that inhibited cell proliferation/migration and induced apoptosis by silencing PANDAR were also observed in bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, over expression of PANDAR in bladder cancer cells promoted the proliferation/migration and suppressed apoptosis. These findings demonstrate that PANDAR plays oncogenic roles in bladder cancer and PANDAR may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target of bladder cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 48%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 56%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Psychology 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,783,333
of 7,729,992 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#108
of 409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,675
of 268,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#5
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,729,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 409 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.