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Update on the safety of second generation antipsychotics in youths: a call for collaboration among paediatricians and child psychiatrists

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
Update on the safety of second generation antipsychotics in youths: a call for collaboration among paediatricians and child psychiatrists
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13052-016-0259-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simone Pisano, Gennaro Catone, Stefania Veltri, Valentina Lanzara, Marco Pozzi, Emilio Clementi, Raffaella Iuliano, Maria Pia Riccio, Sonia Radice, Massimo Molteni, Annalisa Capuano, Antonella Gritti, Giangennaro Coppola, Annarita Milone, Carmela Bravaccio, Gabriele Masi

Abstract

During the past decade, a substantial increase in the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) has occurred for a number of juvenile psychiatric disorders, often as off-label prescriptions. Although they were thought to be safer than older, first generation antipsychotics, mainly due to a lower risk of neurological adverse reactions, recent studies have raised significant concerns regarding their safety regarding metabolic, endocrinological and cardiovascular side effects. Aim of this paper is to update with a narrative review, the latest findings on safety of SGAs in youths. Results suggest that different SGAs may present different safety profiles. Metabolic adverse events are the most frequent and troublesome, with increasing evidences of heightened risk for type II diabetes mellitus. Results are discussed with specific emphasis on possible strategies of an active monitoring, which could enable both paediatricians and child psychiatrists to a possible prevention, early detection, and a timely management of such effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Psychology 5 6%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,274,489
of 18,936,256 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#237
of 758 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,778
of 275,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,936,256 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 758 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.