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Assessing the magnitude and trends in hospital acquired infections in Canadian hospitals through sequential point prevalence surveys

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing the magnitude and trends in hospital acquired infections in Canadian hospitals through sequential point prevalence surveys
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0118-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geoffrey Taylor, Denise Gravel, Anne Matlow, Joanne Embree, Nicole LeSaux, Lynn Johnston, Kathryn N. Suh, Michael John, John Embil, Elizabeth Henderson, Virginia Roth, Alice Wong

Abstract

Healthcare acquired infections (HAI) are an important public health problem in developed countries, but comprehensive data on trends over time are lacking. Prevalence surveys have been used as a surrogate for incidence studies and can be readily repeated. The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program conducted prevalence surveys in 2002 and 2009 in a large network of major Canadian acute care hospitals. NHSN definitions of HAI were used. Use of isolation precautions on the survey day was documented. In 2009, 9,953 acute care inpatients were surveyed; 1,234 infections (124/1000) were found, compared to 111/1000 in 2002, (p < 0.0001). There was increased prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) and Clostridium difficile, offset by decreases in pneumonia and bloodstream infection. Use of isolation precautions increased from 77 to 148 per 1000 patients (p < 0.0001), attributable to increased use of contact precautions in patients infected or colonized with antimicrobial resistant organisms. Between 2002 and 2009 HAI prevalence increased by 11.7 % in a network of major Canadian hospitals due to increases in Clostridium difficile and urinary tract infection. The use of isolation precautions increased by 92.2 % attributable to increased contact isolation. National prevalence surveys are useful tools to assess evolving trends in HAI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 58 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 14 24%
Unknown 13 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 14 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2019.
All research outputs
#925,694
of 15,923,805 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#119
of 907 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,120
of 268,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,923,805 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 907 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,460 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them