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Moderate traumatic brain injury, acute phase course and deviations in physiological variables: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2016
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Title
Moderate traumatic brain injury, acute phase course and deviations in physiological variables: an observational study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0269-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stine B. Lund, Kari H. Gjeilo, Kent G. Moen, Kari Schirmer-Mikalsen, Toril Skandsen, Anne Vik

Abstract

Patients with moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) are a heterogeneous group with great variability in clinical course. Guidelines for monitoring and level of care in the acute phase are lacking. The main aim of this observational study was to describe injury severity and the acute phase course during the first three days post-injury in a cohort of patients with moderate TBI. Deviations from defined parameters in selected physiological variables were also studied, based on guidelines for severe TBI during the same period. During a 5-year period (2004-2009), 119 patients ≥16 years (median age 47 years, range 16-92) with moderate TBI according to the Head Injury Severity Scale were admitted to a Norwegian level 1 trauma centre. Injury-related and acute phase data were collected prospectively. Deviations in six physiological variables were collected retrospectively. Eighty-six percent of the patients had intracranial pathology on CT scan and 61 % had extracranial injuries. Eighty-four percent of all patients were admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) the first day, and 51 % stayed in ICUs ≥3 days. Patients staying in ICUs ≥3 days had lower median Glasgow Coma Scale score; 12 (range 9-15) versus 13 (range 9-15, P = 0.003) and more often extracranial injuries (77 % versus 42 %, P = 0.001) than patients staying in ICU 0-2 days. Most patients staying in ICUs ≥3 days had at least one episode of hypotension (53 %), hypoxia (57 %), hyperthermia (59 %), anaemia (56 %) and hyperglycaemia (65 %), and the proportion of anaemia related to number of measurements was high (33 %). Most of the moderate TBI patients stayed in an ICU the first day, and half of them stayed in ICUs ≥3 days due to not only intracranial, but also extracranial injuries. Deviations in physiological variables were often seen in this latter group of patients. Lack of guidelines for patients with moderate TBI may leave these deviations uncorrected. We propose that in future research of moderate TBI, patients might be differentiated with regard to their need for monitoring and level of care the first few days post-injury. This could contribute to improvement of acute phase management.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Master 8 11%
Other 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Researcher 6 8%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 17%
Psychology 5 7%
Neuroscience 4 6%
Social Sciences 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 20 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,373,208
of 8,607,055 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#421
of 632 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,762
of 274,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#36
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,607,055 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 632 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,886 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.