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Genomic signatures for predicting survival and adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Genomic signatures for predicting survival and adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/1755-8794-5-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan K Van Laar

Abstract

Improved methods are needed for predicting prognosis and the benefit of delivering adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A novel prognostic algorithm was identified using genomic profiles from 332 stage I-III adenocarcinomas and independently validated on a separate series of 264 patients with stage I-II tumors, compiled from five previous studies. The prognostic algorithm was used to interrogate genomic data from a series of patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Those genes associated with outcome in the adjuvant treatment setting, independent to prognosis were used to train an algorithm able to classify a patient as either a responder or non-responder to ACT. The performance of this signature was independently validated on a separate series of genomic profiles from patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of cisplatin/vinorelbine vs. observation alone (JBR.10). NSCLC patients exhibiting the high-risk, poor-prognosis form of the 160-gene prognosis signature experienced a 2.80-times higher rate of 5-year disease specific death (log rank P < 0.0001) compared to those with the low-risk, good prognosis profile, adjusted for covariates. The prognosis signature was found to especially accurate at identifying early stage patients at risk of disease specific death within 24 months of diagnosis when compared to traditional methods of outcome prediction.Separately, NSCLC patients with the 37-gene ACT-response signature (n = 70, 64 %), benefited significantly from cisplatin/vinorelbine (adjusted HR: 0.23, P = 0.0032). For those patients predicted to be responders, receiving this form of ACT conferred a 25 % improvement in the probability of 5-year-survival, compared to observation alone and adjusted for covariates. Conversely, in those patients predicted to be non-responders, ACT was observed to offer no significant survival benefit (adjusted HR: 0.55, P = 0.32).The two gene signatures overlap by one gene only SPSB3, which interacts with the oncogene MET. In this study, higher levels of SPSB3 which were associated with favorable prognosis and benefit from ACT. These complimentary prognostic and predictive gene signatures may assist physicians in their management and treatment of patients with early stage lung cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 31%
Student > Master 8 15%
Other 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 22%
Engineering 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2012.
All research outputs
#2,462,594
of 10,702,941 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#144
of 522 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,781
of 103,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,702,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 522 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 103,631 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.