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Benefit of a single recruitment maneuver after an apnea test for the diagnosis of brain death

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Benefit of a single recruitment maneuver after an apnea test for the diagnosis of brain death
Published in
Critical Care, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/cc11408
Pubmed ID
Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Many potential lung transplants are lost because of hypoxemia during donor management. We hypothesized that the apnea test, necessary to confirm the diagnosis of brain death in potential lung donors, was involved in the decrease in the ratio of partial pressure of arterial O2 to fraction of inspired O2 (PaO2/FiO2) and that a single recruitment maneuver performed just after the apnea test can reverse this alteration. METHODS: In this case-control study, we examined the effectiveness of the recruitment maneuver with a comparison cohort of brain dead patients who did not receive the maneuver. Patients were matched one-to-one on the basis of initial PaO2/FiO2 and on the duration of mechanical ventilation before the apnea test. PaO2/FiO2 was measured before (T1), at the end (T2) and two hours after apnea test (T3). RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients were included in each group. The apnea test was associated with a significant decrease in PaO2/FiO2 from 284 ± 98 to 224 ± 104 mmHg (P < 0.001). The decrease in PaO2/FiO2 between T1 and T3 was significantly lower in the recruitment maneuver group than in the control group (-4 (-68-57) vs -61 (-110--18) mmHg, P = 0.02). The number of potential donors with PaO2/FiO2 > 300 mmHg decreased by 58% (95% CI: 28-85%) in the control group vs 0% (95% CI: 0-34%) in the recruitment maneuver group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The apnea test induced a decrease in PaO2/FiO2 in potential lung donors. A single recruitment maneuver performed immediately after the apnea test can reverse this alteration and may prevent the loss of potential lung donors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 3%
France 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Czechia 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 35 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 15%
Other 6 15%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 10 25%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 53%
Engineering 4 10%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Materials Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2012.
All research outputs
#1,990,145
of 4,507,072 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,435
of 2,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,063
of 75,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#61
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,072 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 75,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.