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A systematic review of community based hepatitis C treatment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
A systematic review of community based hepatitis C treatment
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1548-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda J. Wade, Vanessa Veronese, Margaret E. Hellard, Joseph S. Doyle

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment uptake globally is low. A barrier to treatment is the necessity to attend specialists, usually in a tertiary hospital. We investigate the literature to assess the effect of providing HCV treatment in the community on treatment uptake and cure. Three databases were searched for studies that contained a comparison between HCV treatment uptake or sustained virologic response (SVR) in a community site and a tertiary site. Treatment was with standard interferon with or without ribavirin, or pegylated interferon and ribavirin. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Thirteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Six studies measured treatment uptake; three demonstrated an increase in uptake at the community site, two demonstrated similar rates between sites and one demonstrated decreased uptake at the community site. Nine studies measured SVR; four demonstrated higher SVR rates in the community, four demonstrated similar SVR rates, and one demonstrated inferior SVR rates in the community compared to the tertiary site. The data available supports the efficacy of HCV treatment in the community, and the potential for community based treatment to increase treatment uptake. Whilst further studies are required, these findings highlight the potential benefit of providing community based HCV care - benefits that should be realised as interferon-free therapy become available. (PROSPERO registration number CRD42015025505).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Psychology 4 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,602,317
of 7,820,779 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,585
of 3,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,432
of 269,005 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#58
of 162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,820,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,489 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,005 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.