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Damage effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound on breast cancer tissues and their vascularities

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, January 2016
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Title
Damage effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound on breast cancer tissues and their vascularities
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12957-016-0908-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guan, Liming, Xu, Gang, Liming Guan, Gang Xu

Abstract

High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive therapy that makes entire coagulative necrosis of a tumor in deep tissue through the intact skin. There are many reports about the HIFU's efficacy in the treatment of patients with breast cancer, but randomized clinical trials are rare which emphasize on the systematic assessment of histological changes in the ablated tumor vascularities, while clinical trials utilizing bevacizumab and other anti-angiogenic drugs in breast cancer have not demonstrated overall survival benefit. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the damage effect of HIFU on breast cancer tissues and their vascularities. Randomized clinical trials and the modality of treat-and-resect protocols were adopted. The treated outcome of all patients was followed up in this study. The target lesions of 25 breast cancer patients treated by HIFU were observed after autopsy. One slide was used for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, one slide was used for elastic fiber staining by Victoria blue and Ponceau's histochemical staining, and one slide was used for vascular endothelial cell immunohistochemical staining with biotinylated-ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI); all three slides were observed under an optical microscopic. One additional slide was systematically observed by electron microscopy. The average follow-up time was 12 months; no local recurrence or a distant metastatic lesion was detected among treated patients. Histological examination of the HE slides indicated that HIFU caused coagulative necrosis in the tumor tissues and their vascularities: all feeder vessels less than 2 mm in diameter in the insonated tumor were occluded, the vascular elasticity provided by fibrin was lost, the cells were disordered and delaminated, and UEAI staining of the target lesions was negative. Immediately after HIFU irradiation, the tumor capillary ultrastructure was destroyed, the capillary endothelium was disintegrated, the peritubular cells were cavitated, and the plasma membrane was incomplete. HIFU ablation can destroy all proliferating tumor cells and their growing vascularities simultaneously; this may break interdependent vicious cycle of tumor angiogenesis and neoplastic cell growth that results in infinite proliferation. While it cannot cause tumor resistance to HIFU ablation, it may be a new anti-angiogenic strategy that needs further clinical observation and exploration. Furthermore, the treatment indications of HIFU ablation were reviewed and discussed in this manuscript.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 21 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 20%
Engineering 14 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 27 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,661,456
of 7,831,397 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#471
of 1,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,468
of 269,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#6
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,831,397 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,219 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.