↓ Skip to main content

Monoscopic photogrammetry to obtain 3D models by a mobile device: a method for making facial prostheses

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 432)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
159 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Monoscopic photogrammetry to obtain 3D models by a mobile device: a method for making facial prostheses
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40463-016-0145-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rodrigo Salazar-Gamarra, Rosemary Seelaus, Jorge Vicente Lopes da Silva, Airton Moreira da Silva, Luciano Lauria Dib

Abstract

The aim of this study is to present the development of a new technique to obtain 3D models using photogrammetry by a mobile device and free software, as a method for making digital facial impressions of patients with maxillofacial defects for the final purpose of 3D printing of facial prostheses. With the use of a mobile device, free software and a photo capture protocol, 2D captures of the anatomy of a patient with a facial defect were transformed into a 3D model. The resultant digital models were evaluated for visual and technical integrity. The technical process and resultant models were described and analyzed for technical and clinical usability. Generating 3D models to make digital face impressions was possible by the use of photogrammetry with photos taken by a mobile device. The facial anatomy of the patient was reproduced by a *.3dp and a *.stl file with no major irregularities. 3D printing was possible. An alternative method for capturing facial anatomy is possible using a mobile device for the purpose of obtaining and designing 3D models for facial rehabilitation. Further studies must be realized to compare 3D modeling among different techniques and systems. Free software and low cost equipment could be a feasible solution to obtain 3D models for making digital face impressions for maxillofacial prostheses, improving access for clinical centers that do not have high cost technology considered as a prior acquisition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 159 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 22%
Student > Bachelor 20 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 33 21%
Unknown 28 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 49%
Engineering 19 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Design 4 3%
Psychology 3 2%
Other 14 9%
Unknown 37 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2022.
All research outputs
#1,935,792
of 21,722,534 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#16
of 432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,999
of 282,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,722,534 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them