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Transition to practice: can rural interprofessional education make a difference? A cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 2,437)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
166 Mendeley
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Title
Transition to practice: can rural interprofessional education make a difference? A cohort study
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0674-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan Pullon, Christine Wilson, Peter Gallagher, Margot Skinner, Eileen McKinlay, Lesley Gray, Patrick McHugh

Abstract

The transition from student to health practitioner at entry-to-practice is complex, requiring critical acquisition of collaborative practice skills. In rural communities where health need is multidimensional, there is potential for multiple intentional collaborative learning objectives to be met concurrently. A five-week, rurally-located, clinically-based interprofessional programme was introduced as a transition-to-practice rotation for final-year, pre-registration health professional students in the professions of dentistry, dietetics, medicine, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy. The programme integrated learning objectives in four related domains: interprofessional practice; hauora Māori (Māori health); rural health; long-term condition management. This study investigated student learning experiences over the first two complete years of the programme, comparing responses from participating students with those from a cohort of non-participating peers. Using a pre and post quasi-experimental design, respondents from two successive student year cohorts completed questionnaires at the start and end of their final year. Additional survey data were collected from participating students at the end of each rotation. 131 students participated in the programme during 2013-2014. Participating student respondents (55/131;42 %) reported being significantly better prepared than a cohort of 56 non-participating colleagues in many aspects of their understanding of and knowledge about each of four key learning domains. 94 % (123/131) of programme participants completed end-of-rotation questionnaires. Positive from the outset (mean 5-point Likert scale scores between 3 and 5; 5 = most positive), student satisfaction further increased across all domains in the second year (mean 5-point Likert scale scores between 4 and 5). At entry-to-practice level, multiple learning objectives, including indigenous health learning, can be met simultaneously in the clinical context within an integrated, rotational programme. Rural settings are highly suitable for delivering such programmes if well supported.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 166 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 <1%
Unknown 165 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 17%
Student > Bachelor 22 13%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 48 29%
Unknown 23 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 62 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 17%
Social Sciences 15 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 29 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 41. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#614,904
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#44
of 2,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,610
of 273,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,150 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them