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Kidney function decline after a non-dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury is associated with higher long-term mortality in critically ill survivors

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, July 2012
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1 tweeter

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Kidney function decline after a non-dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury is associated with higher long-term mortality in critically ill survivors
Published in
Critical Care, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/cc11419
Pubmed ID
Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adverse consequences of a non-dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury (AKI) are unclear. This study aimed to assess the long-term prognoses for critically ill patients experiencing a non-dialysis-requiring AKI. METHODS: This retrospective observational cohort study investigated non-dialysis-requiring AKI survivors in surgical intensive care units between January 2002 and June 2010. All longitudinal post-discharge serum creatinine measurements and information regarding end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death were collected. We assessed the long-term outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD), ESRD and all-cause mortality beyond discharge. RESULTS: Of the 922 identified critically ill patients with a non-dialysis-requiring AKI, 634 (68.8%) patients who survived to discharge were enrolled. A total of 207 patients died after a median follow-up of 700.5 days. The median intervals between the onset of the AKI and the composite endpoints "stage 3 CKD or death", "stage 4 CKD or death", "stage 5 CKD or death", and "ESRD or death" were 685, 1319, 1743, and 2048 days, respectively. This finding shows a steady long-term decline in kidney function after discharge. Using the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, we found that every 1 mL/min/1.73 m2 decrease from baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of individuals who progressed to stage 3, 4, and 5 CKD increased the risks of long-term mortality by 0.7%, 2.3%, and 4.1%, respectively (all p < 0.05). This result indicates that the mortality risk increased significantly in a graded manner as kidney function declined from the baseline eGFR to advanced stages of CKD during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients who survive a non-dialysis-requiring AKI, there is a need for continuous monitoring and kidney function protection beyond discharge.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 64 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Master 10 15%
Other 9 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 19 28%
Unknown 7 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 66%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2012.
All research outputs
#3,061,447
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#2,053
of 2,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,448
of 75,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#96
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.