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Facilitators and barriers to NCD prevention in Pakistanis–invincibility or inevitability: a qualitative research study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, May 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Facilitators and barriers to NCD prevention in Pakistanis–invincibility or inevitability: a qualitative research study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2087-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ambreen Gowani, Hafiz Imtiaz Ahmed, Wardah Khalid, Abdul Muqeet, Saad Abdullah, Shariq Khoja, Ayeesha Kamran Kamal

Abstract

Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading causes of death globally. In Pakistan, they are among the top ten causes of mortality, especially in the productive age group (30-69 years). Evidence suggests that health perceptions and beliefs strongly influence the health behavior of an individual. We performed focus group interviews to delineate the same so as to design the user interface of a non-invasive stroke risk monitoring device. It was a qualitative study, designed to explore how health perceptions and beliefs influence behavior for NCD prevention. Four focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with 30 stable participants who had diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, blood pressure, and stroke. The data was collected using a semi-structured interview guide designed to explore participants' perceptions of their illnesses, self-management behaviors and factors affecting them. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was done using steps of content analysis by Morse and Niehaus [10]. Medication adherence, self-monitoring of blood sugars and blood pressures, and medical help seeking were the commonly performed self-management behaviors by the participants. Personal experience of illness, familial inheritance of disease, education and fear of premature death when life responsibilities were unfulfilled, emerged as strong facilitators of self-management behaviors. A sense of personal invincibility, Fatalism or inevitability, lack of personal threat realization, limited knowledge, inadequate health education, health care and financial constraints appeared as key barriers to the self-management of chronic disease in participants. Behavioural interventional messaging will have to engender a sense of personal vulnerability and yet empower self-efficacy solutions at the individual level to deal with both invincibility and inevitability barriers to adoption of healthy behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 22%
Social Sciences 9 10%
Psychology 7 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 18 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2016.
All research outputs
#2,615,461
of 9,723,837 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#613
of 2,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,638
of 276,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#28
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,837 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,406 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,731 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.