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Implementation of basic quality control tests for malaria medicines in Amazon Basin countries: results for the 2005–2010 period

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
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Title
Implementation of basic quality control tests for malaria medicines in Amazon Basin countries: results for the 2005–2010 period
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2012
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-11-202
Pubmed ID
Authors

Victor S Pribluda, Adrian Barojas, Arletta Añez, Cecilia G López, Ruth Figueroa, Roxana Herrera, Gladys Nakao, Fernando HA Nogueira, Gerson A Pianetti, Marinete M Povoa, Giselle MR Viana, Margarete S Mendonça Gomes, Jose P Escobar, Olga L Muñoz Sierra, Susana P Rendon Norena, Raúl Veloz, Marcy Silva Bravo, Martha R Aldás, Alison HindsSemple, Marilyn Collins, Nicolas Ceron, Karanchand Krishnalall, Malti Adhin, Gustavo Bretas, Nelly Hernandez, Marjorie Mendoza, Abdelkrim Smine, Kennedy Chibwe, Patrick Lukulay, Lawrence Evans

Abstract

Ensuring the quality of malaria medicines is crucial in working toward malaria control and eventual elimination. Unlike other validated tests that can assess all critical quality attributes, which is the standard for determining the quality of medicines, basic tests are significantly less expensive, faster, and require less skilled labour; yet, these tests provide reproducible data and information on several critical quality attributes, such as identity, purity, content, and disintegration. Visual and physical inspection also provides valuable information about the manufacturing and the labelling of medicines, and in many cases this inspection is sufficient to detect counterfeit medicines. The Promoting the Quality of Medicines (PQM) programme has provided technical assistance to Amazon Malaria Initiative (AMI) countries to implement the use of basic tests as a key screening mechanism to assess the quality of malaria medicines available to patients in decentralized regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Indonesia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 63 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,898,664
of 21,334,388 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#398
of 5,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,250
of 107,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,334,388 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,314 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,241 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them