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Antiproliferative and antimetabolic effects behind the anticancer property of fermented wheat germ extract

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2016
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Antiproliferative and antimetabolic effects behind the anticancer property of fermented wheat germ extract
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12906-016-1138-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christoph Otto, Theresa Hahlbrock, Kilian Eich, Ferdi Karaaslan, Constantin Jürgens, Christoph-Thomas Germer, Armin Wiegering, Ulrike Kämmerer

Abstract

Fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE) sold under the trade name Avemar exhibits anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Its mechanisms of action are divided into antiproliferative and antimetabolic effects. Its influcence on cancer cell metabolism needs further investigation. One objective of this study, therefore, was to further elucidate the antimetabolic action of FWGE. The anticancer compound 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ) is the major bioactive compound in FWGE and is probably responsible for its anticancer activity. The second objective of this study was to compare the antiproliferative properties in vitro of FWGE and the DMBQ compound. The IC50 values of FWGE were determined for nine human cancer cell lines after 24 h of culture. The DMBQ compound was used at a concentration of 24 μmol/l, which is equal to the molar concentration of DMBQ in FWGE. Cell viability, cell cycle, cellular redox state, glucose consumption, lactic acid production, cellular ATP levels, and the NADH/NAD(+) ratio were measured. The mean IC50 value of FWGE for the nine human cancer cell lines tested was 10 mg/ml. Both FWGE (10 mg/ml) and the DMBQ compound (24 μmol/l) induced massive cell damage within 24 h after starting treatment, with changes in the cellular redox state secondary to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Unlike the DMBQ compound, which was only cytotoxic, FWGE exhibited cytostatic and growth delay effects in addition to cytotoxicity. Both cytostatic and growth delay effects were linked to impaired glucose utilization which influenced the cell cycle, cellular ATP levels, and the NADH/NAD(+) ratio. The growth delay effect in response to FWGE treatment led to induction of autophagy. FWGE and the DMBQ compound both induced oxidative stress-promoted cytotoxicity. In addition, FWGE exhibited cytostatic and growth delay effects associated with impaired glucose utilization which led to autophagy, a possible previously unknown mechanism behind the influence of FWGE on cancer cell metabolism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 31%
Other 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Chemistry 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,144,507
of 11,467,880 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,300
of 2,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,876
of 276,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#27
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,467,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,393 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,619 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.