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Are all immigrant mothers really at risk of low birth weight and perinatal mortality? The crucial role of socio-economic status

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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50 Dimensions

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150 Mendeley
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Title
Are all immigrant mothers really at risk of low birth weight and perinatal mortality? The crucial role of socio-economic status
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0860-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Judith Racape, Claudia Schoenborn, Mouctar Sow, Sophie Alexander, Myriam De Spiegelaere

Abstract

Increasing studies show that immigrants have different perinatal health outcomes compared to native women. Nevertheless, we lack a systematic examination of the combined effects of immigrant status and socioeconomic factors on perinatal outcomes. Our objectives were to analyse national Belgian data to determine 1) whether socioeconomic status (SES) modifies the association between maternal nationality and perinatal outcomes (low birth weight and perinatal mortality); 2) the effect of adopting the Belgian nationality on the association between maternal foreign nationality and perinatal outcomes. This study is a population-based study using the data from linked birth and death certificates from the Belgian civil registration system. Data are related to all singleton births to mothers living in Belgium between 1998 and 2010. Perinatal mortality and low birth weight (LBW) were estimated by SES (maternal education and parental employment status) and by maternal nationality (at her own birth and at her child's birth). We used logistic regression to estimate the odds ratios for the associations between nationality and perinatal outcomes after adjusting for and stratifying by SES. The present study includes, for the first time, all births in Belgium; that is 1,363,621 singleton births between 1998 and 2010. Compared to Belgians, we observed an increased risk of perinatal mortality in all migrant groups (p < 0.0001), despite lower rates of LBW in some nationalities. Immigrant mothers with the Belgian nationality had similar rates of perinatal mortality to women of Belgian origin and maintained their protection against LBW (p < 0.0001). After adjustment, the excess risk of perinatal mortality among immigrant groups was mostly explained by maternal education; whereas for sub-Saharan African mothers, mortality was mainly affected by parental employment status. After stratification by SES, we have uncovered a significant protective effect of immigration against LBW and perinatal mortality for women with low SES but not for high SES. Our results show a protective effect of migration in relation to perinatal mortality and LBW among women of low SES. Hence, the study underlines the importance of taking into account socioeconomic status in order to understand more fully the relationship between migration and perinatal outcomes. Further studies are needed to analyse more finely the impact of socio-economic characteristics on perinatal outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Unknown 148 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 36 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 24%
Social Sciences 26 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 17%
Psychology 11 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 9 6%
Unknown 40 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2016.
All research outputs
#3,823,141
of 7,847,043 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,102
of 1,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,124
of 269,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#41
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,847,043 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,601 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.